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and caution the u.s. is investigating claims that the syrian president bashar assad used them, the president bristleed when israeli reporter suggested the u.s. has been sitting on their hands. >> it's incorrect for you to say we have done nothing. we helped mobilize the isolation of the assad regime internationally. we have supported and recognized the opposition. >> the president first said assad's days were numbers 19 months ago. last summer, he warned of potential u.s. force against syria. >> red line for us. we start saying bunch of chemical weapons moving around or utilized. that would change my calculus. >> back in washington today, the top republican charged the administration's policy has been adrift. >> the obama administration saw assad as a reformer in their words. it backed the u.n. diplomacy and bet on moscow to play a productive role. none of this worked. >> netanyahu's intelligence director said it's clear that the chemical weapons were used in syria. the chairman of the house intelligence committee said he believes that chemical weapons were used by the regime as a caveat. >>
with the civil war in syria. how? the secretary says that iraq has been helping prop up assad as he fights for power there. kerry making an unannounced visitor to iraq and meeting with nuri al-maliki. and stopping the flow of weapons into neighboring syria. weapons that are only making the civil war more deadly. and steve centanni is here. how are they flowing into syria? >> reporter: according to u.s. officials there are flights just about every day, from iran to syria travelling across the iraqi air space. iran says they carry humanitarian aid, but u.s. says they carry weapons to the syrian government. and secretary of state john kerry urged al-maliki to crack down on the flights requiring they land in iraq for inspection before continuing on to syria. >> we had a very spirited discussion on the subject of the overflights and i made it very clear, anything that supports president assad is problematic. >> kerry suggested the future of u.s.-iraqi relations is hanging in the balance here, harris. >> harris: given the recent talks and the possibility of chemical weapons used on citizens and
's thinking on what to do about syria, how the united states can help move to the post-assad period. >> let me ask you quickly about this speech, because it's coming up in about 40 minutes. obviously, the relationship, if you look at the polls between the president and the israeli people, has been strained as well. here's what a university professor wrote in "the daily beast" this morning. mr. obama will be talking to young people who are neither listless cynics nor disaffected sofa-plit koes. many of them have marched in demonstrations and took active part in protest rallies. our record of effective activism is by comparison to every other recent social movement, stellar. is this an important speech for him there? if so, what should his message be? >> well, it is an important speech. he has about a 10% approval rating in israel. that will undoubtedly tick up. but this is part of the president's style. you remember in 2009 he spoke at cairo university. he's made a choice here. he's not going to speak government to government. he's going to move beyond that dialogue to talk directly to the isra
.s. is training fighters to join the battle against president bashar assad owho has been slaughtering his own people for more than two years now. the program has been going on in jordan for at least 8 months. the trainees do not include members of free syrian army which has meanwhile the u.s. reports it's pulling half of its foreign staffers out of syria after a mortar attack damaged their hotel and a vehicle in damascus. a spokesman says that the move is temporary and united nations is still committed to finding a political solution to that bloody civil war. the united nations now we are hearing about new fox report correspondent more sign today of how tough this remains for that opposition. >> on a military and political level, first the e founder and one the leaders of the free syrian army has been badly wounded in a car bomb attack. in fact, we are hearing that that gentleman right there has lost a leg. that a major blow to the free syria army. then on the political front, the leader of the syrian national coalition has resigned. citing differences with other senior figures within the opp
. >>> and now syria. the assad regime and rebel forces are accusing one another of using chemical weapons. syrian state media reported that rebel forces launched a chemical attack killing at least two dozen people, injuring more than 100 people. rebels deny that charge vehemently and accuse regime forces of shelling a town near damascus with chemical rockets. our senior international reporter is in amman, jordan, this morning. i know there are a lot of questions to substantiating the claims. what do we know so far? >> reporter: most of the information is coming from syrian state tv. and that's claiming that at least 25 people were killed in some kind of an attack in a village. scores of people wounded. and then syrian state tv playing interviews with some of the alleged victims who were saying that they smelled chlorine and almost all aping the same message, is this the freedom that the free syrian army rebels want? so some of those statements do come out to be a little suspect. neither side has been entirely truthful when it comes to the information and media war over syria. now very qui
before assad goes. jessica yellin is live from amman, jordan where that press conference just wrapped. jessica, the president said assad would go but sounded perhaps a little annoyed about being asked how that might happen. why was he seemingly annoyed? >> well, jake, we counted and this is the sixth time that the president or a member of his administration has said assad must go just in the last month alone. but none of them has laid out a plan or a path for direct action by the united states to help remove assad from power. without any direct military intervention by the u.s. the president knows he is vulnerable to criticism. that he is standing by while a massacre is taking place and that is a particularly sharp and poignant charge when he is standing here in jordan where they are providing refuge to some 7,000 syrians who are fleeing for safety every day. some 7,000 people crossing the border into jordan from syria each day because of the violence there. >> i believe the king abdullah of jordan said that the settlements of refugees now form something like the fifth largest town in
the ancient city of petra. ramp up criticism of syrian president bashar assad. >> ed henry is live this morning in amman jordan with the very latest. good morning, ed. >> good toe sue i goose, interesting. because as you know you have got syria on jordan's northern border. and there are hundreds of thousands of refugees spilled out because of that ongoing civil war. all that strife. the violence, president assad killing his own people. they are winding up here in jordan. many of them and there is a lot of pressure building. damaging his economy big time pressure on president obama at home all around the world to intervene in some way. carl levin saying saying there should be some kind of surgical air strike. maybe the president should help set up a no-fly zone around syria to pressure assad. the bottom line is the president at a news conference here yesterday said he feels like it's a situation where is he damned if he does, damned if he doesn't. take a listen. >> your question may be suggesting is why haven't we simply gone in militarily? and, you know, i think it's fair to say th
's a long standing syria through the decline or democrat myself of the assad regime, which i think is inevitable, will be a serious blow to iran. >> so if you have washington, sir, on one side of the scale and tehran on the other, who does baghdad more closely align with? >> well, our hope is, of course, that it will be a truly democratic regime which will be primarily loyal to the interests of the people in iraq and that their views will be consistent with others in supporting and strengthening democratic institutions. but as with many of the other countries in the middle east, there are a whole series of conflicting interests there and it will play out over a long period of time. but our interest is in democratic institutions, democratic societies who will serve their people and not be so much interested in the kinds of conflicts that have raged for so long in that region. >> you mentioned your hopes are for the inevitable assad regime there in syria. but today one of the national coalition, the head of that resigned. he was the key u.s. ally among the rebels. how big of a blow i
are saying that the more desperate bashar al assad becomes, the more dangerous he also becomes. >> we've been very clear about our concerns that the assad regime is increasingly beleaguered, that it finds that the violence that it is using by conventional means is inadequate, including its barbaric use of scuds so we are quite concerned that they will resort to other weapons. we've made clear that this would constitute a red line for the united states. the president could not have been clearer about it. >> there are no plans right now to put any boots on the ground. but last year, the pentagon did do a report analyzing what it would take to secure those chemical weapons. they concluded it may take up to 70,000 troops on the ground. >> all right, chris lawrence at the pentagon, thanks. in just a few minutes we're going to talk to israeli government spokesman mark regev about the latest in syria and the president's trip to israel. >>> a disturbing story from colorado. zoraida sambolin has that. >> this just in to cnn the executive director of colorado's corrections department shot and killed la
whether our policy is right. it's not too early to know how history will judge assad. that's easy. but in terms of whether or not we have proceeded in a more deliberate way than some would want us to, and probably a little more than i would want us to if you want to get into that, nonetheless the goal here is to make sure that what happens after assad is, is stable, is diverse, is not chaotic. that the right people are the ones that take over when assad goes. and that's, that's a matter of putting in place, if possible, a kind of an interim political coalition, which will have broad support inside of syria, which will not see a long period of retribution and violence following the fall of assad which will happen. and putting that in place to the extent that's possible is what is going on now. at the same time, supporting the opposition, at least those elements of the opposition which we believe are positive, constructive, progressive elements, but that are not the extreme element that otherwise could turn syria into a, if possible, hard to imagine, even, worst case, than is with a
. the fact that hezbollah has allied the assad regime has stockpiles of chemical weapons only heightens the urgency. we will continue to cooperate closely to guard against that danger. i've made it clear to bashar al assad and all who follow his orders, we will not tolerate the use of chemical weapons against the syrian people or the transfer of those weapons to terrorists. the world is watching. we will hold you accountable. the syrian people have the right to be freed from the grip of a dictator who would rather kill his own people than relinquish power. assad must go, so that syria's future can begin. because true stability in syria depends upon establishing a government that is responsible to its people. one that protects all communities within its borders, while making peace with countries beyond them. these are the things i think about when i think about israel's security. when i consider israel's security, i also think about a people who have a living memory of the holocaust, faced with the prospect of a nuclear-armed iranian government who has called for israel's destruction. it
massacre of the same people by president assad. fortunately, the syrian nuclear capacity was destroyed. but unfortunately, thousands of chemical weapons remain. we cann we cannot allow those weapons to fall in the terrorists' hands. it could lead to an epic tragedy. in an attempt to spring to the arab world, it is an arab choice, it is an arab initiative. it may bring peace to the region, freedom to the people, economic growth to the arab states. eventually, it can lead to a better tomorrow. we pray it will become a reality. i believe the real division is between skeptics and those who believe in peace. your voice will encourage, i believe. you came to us with the clear message that no one should let skepticism win the day. a vision that says clearly that peace is not only a wish, but a possibility. i fully support your call. there is no other way to make the fooch better. there is no better leader to make it possible. your visit is an historic step in that direction. we shall journey with you all the way. thank you. >> thank you so much. well, thank you, president peres, for your very
deny allowing the transfer of weapons through iraqi air space to president al assad's regime. >>> if you haven't heard the news yet, the winning powerball ticket for $338 million was sold in new jersey. sadly not here in atlanta. the winning numbers are 17, 29, 31, 52, 53. p powerball number is 31. the largest powerball jackpot in history was back in november. it was worth close to $588 million. >>> it is officially spring. may favorite season. birds, flowers, and great outdoors finally shakes off its winter coat. let me show you some glorious pring d spring days around the country just today. isn't that beautiful? kansas city, missouri. didn't get the memo that spring officially arrived four days ago. three to nine inches of snow. knocked out power to 5,000 homes today. atlanta, powerful thunderstorms. all night long. pushed over huge trees on to houses and cars. fell much colder than normal. water is rising all over the atlanta area. flood warnings in some places. and this is colorado. all around denver today. single digit temperatures and snow that shut down parts of both
and white house press secretary jay carney issued a warning to the assad regime. >> we have no evidence to substantiate the charge that the opposition has used chemical weapons. we are deeply skeptical of a regime has lost all credibility and warn the regime against making these kind of charges as any kind of pretext or cover for its use of chemical weapons. >> neither side of the conflict has provided documentation that chemical agents have been used. senator lindsey graham spoke about the allegations telling foreign policy that quote this. we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapons sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. if the choice is to send in troops to secure the weapons sites versus allowing chemical weapons to get in the hands of some of the most violent people in the world, i vote to cut this off before it becomes a problem. but following intelligence briefings, the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committee said they believe president bashar al assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i
assad can hang on? an update on syria the most important item here. >> what was really accomplished, john, in this trip overall? >> reporter: you know, you have to say, don, i think what was accomplished is important foundations were set down. we'll see in the weeks and months ahead whether they produced the results the president wants. let's go through one of them, very important, not on the schedule. that was the president brokering a call this morning, between the israeli prime minister and the turkish prime minister. two traditional allies who have not had normal relations for about three years now. remember, that gaza blockade, israeli commandos killed some turks on a boat out, trying to bring humanitarian aid to gaza, relations broke off. the president brokered a call this morning in which prime minister netanyahu apologized to prime minister erdogan, promised to bring restitution to the families back in the united states. to have them back, back on the same page, is very, very important. also comparing notes with the israeli leadership about the diplomacy with iran over its n
iraq of helping syrian president bashar al assad arm fighters from iran to cross into syria from iraq. >>> and new this morning, former penn state assistant football coach jerry sandusky breaking his silence from behind bars. a documentary filmmaker saying he has recorded telephone conversations with sand us ki that will air today on nbc. the family of the late joe paterno, the head football coach whose career ended in disgrace are already speaking out. they called the recording quote a sad and unfortunate development saying it's transparently self-serving, and yet another insult to the victims and anyone who cares about the truth in this tragic story. >>> a public memorial service for colorado's prison chief will be held today in colorado springs. tom clement was laid to rest yesterday in a private funeral. he was shot and killed tuesday in his driveway. the parolee authorities believe did it was killed thursday in a shutout in texas. he's also believed to have killed a pizza deliveryman. >>> and the supreme court takes up the issue of same-sex marriage starting tomorrow dozens of pe
sit down and figure out what happens to syria after their president assad is gone. convincing iraq to stop that, the iraqi election to prime minister al-maliki recently and suddenly delayed for six months and secretary of state is to convince him and reverse course and not waiting for a vote. and a meeting got underway in the last half hour or so, at some points we expect to see kerry at a solo press conference in iraq and we hope to get an update then about how things have been going on this surprise trip. back to you in new york. >> alisyn: peter, thank you very much for the update. let's get to the rest of your headlines. another fox news for you right now. let's take a live look from vatican city. this is pope francis celebrating palm sunday mass in a packed st. peter's square and next to easter the most holy day in the catholic church. this is a day after pope francis met with pope emeritus benedict xvi, and the two spoke privately for about 45 minutes and then the two prayed side by side. a tragic skydiving accident in florida that left two people dead. an experienced instruc
syria if president assad is overthrown. he also said he will, quote, keep plugging away, unquote, in hopes of restarting peace talks between israel and the palestinians. >>> and lawmakers in north dakota have passed what could lead to the most restricted abortion law in the nation. they passed a resolution that says life begins at conception essentially banning all abortions. voters will next decide next year if they want to add that to the state constitution. if it were to pass, that law would almost certainly trigger a lengthy legal battle. >>> and a frightening scene in a restaurant in philadelphia, pennsylvania. police are asking for help trying to find this gunman firing into a chinese restaurant earlier this week. the workers inside managed to fight back keeping the man from entering the store while dodging imagine this bullets. three wounded. none of the injuries is considered life-threatening. >>> and now to that storm that ginger was telling us about that wreaked havoc at a soccer game in colorado last night. the u.s. and costa rica played through a blizzard for their wo
weapons and also warning the assad regime that it would be a major incident, that if the assad regime were to use chemicals, it would be taking military steps against it. but there is no evident yet, according to u.s. officials here today, that that actually happened on tuesday. that incident, it could have been some form of noxious gas that was used for crowd control by the regime. but the president said in a joint news conference with prime minister netanyahu yesterday that there's absolutely no evidence and he completely rejects the regime's contentions that it was the opposition that used those chemicals. >> i am deeply skeptical of any claim that, in fact, it was the opposition that used chemical weapons. the broader point is that once we establish the facts, i have made clear that the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. >> reporter: the u.n. is investigating the incident. and congressional sources say that the intelligence committees have been briefed and that the administration has full authority to get militarily involved if chemical weapons, if there's any proof of chemical
with our allies to address these threats that have developed while bashar al-assad remains in power. and to begin the important planning to address the challenges that will come with his fall, such as how best to secure chemical weapon stockpiles. none of these threats or challenges can be addressed with simple, easy answers but i fully support america working with prime minister netanyahu and king abdullah to craft a regional strategy that serves all of our national interests. mr. president, i yield the floor. ms. ayotte: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new hampshire. ms. ayotte: thank you, mr. president. i rise today to discuss something of deep importance to me, and i believe to our country. last night, there -- ms. mikulski: mr. president, not to object, what is the parliamentary situation? are we in a quorum call? the presiding officer: we are not in a quorum call. ms. mikulski: are not? the presiding officer: are not. ms. ayotte: thank you. last night, the majority leader of the senate came to the floor and on the continuing resolution, which is essentia
that chemical weapons were used in syria. she would not say that it is tied to the assad regime, she would not say who was behind it, but she is not the only israeli official now to go on the record and say in israeli estimation, chemical weapons were used. that is not what u.s. officials are saying. so, again, to emphasize, the white house is not sharing that same assessment at this point. but, clearly, this adds a new measure of urgency to the israeli perspective on this consideration. syria is right over the border from israel. there are a number of concerns for israel in this regard. one, chemical weapons, any attack there could actually hurt israelis, because it's so close. there's a potential refugee problem, and they'd be concerned that chemical weapons could get to their enemies, hezbollah, in lebanon. but beyond that, ashleigh, you asked if this would overtake iran as a concern, and the answer is no. because this trip for the president is largely about israel's security broadly. and the u.s. assuring israelis that the president stands for keeping israel safe, and when it comes to
and closer to some sort of multilateral action, particularly if there is a confirmation that the assad regime in syria has used chemical weapons in violation of international law and basic humanitarian rights. i think it was vital that president obama went to israel at this critical moment. it was a great speech and reaffirmation of a fundamental relationship in particular that he recognized that israel is a jewish home land and a right to exist and self-defense in face of both a iranian nuclear weapons program. it is a very unstable situation in syria and in the region. this was a vital important moment for president obama, both to reassure the israeli people that we are their most vital ally, that we have an unshakeable relationship but also to urge forward a peace process that could help stabilize the region. >> dr. brzezinski, off of what senator coons just said, we have this decades old issue of trying to come up with a peace settlement within israel. yet, right now, the area, the fuses around israel so volatile and fast burning. syria, jordan, iran, egypt. talk about the degree of diffi
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